Mongolian dating sites

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From the perspective of moderns, who tend to conceive of historical patterns and forces in economic, or at least ideological, terms, this fixation on blood descent seems ridiculous.

I suspect that many pre-modern people, who were accustomed to small family groups and kin networks in a way we are not, would find our own surprise rather perplexing. First, they discovered that there was a particular Y chromosomal haplotype, a set of unique genetic markers, which was found across much of Asia.

In Russia among the Muslim Tatars and in Central Asia among the Uzbeks descent from Genghis Khan was a major calling card for any would-be warlord.

This is peculiar in light of the fact that Genghis Khan, and his near descendants, were non-Muslims!

Not only were they non-Muslims, but the Mongol assault on West Asian Muslims societies was particularly deleterious; it is generally assumed that Iran and Mesopotamia’s relatively productive irrigation system were wrecked during the Mongol conquests to the point where it took centuries for them to rebound to their previous levels of productivity.

More symbolically, it was the Mongols who finally extinguished the Abbasid Caliphate.

It’s characterized by a core haplotype, a nearby set of variants separated by one mutational step.

This suggests that the genetic variant has risen rapidly in frequency before mutations had time to build up variation and generate a more complex topology.

Such a rapid spread cannot have occurred by chance; it must have been a result of selection.

For example the Manchu lineage and the Uí Néill lineage.

The existence of these Y chromosomal lineages, which have burst upon the genetic landscape like explosive stars sweeping aside all other variation before them, indicates a periodic it “winner-take-all” dynamic in human genetics more reminiscent of hyper-polygynous mammals such as elephant seals.

As we do not exhibit the sexual dimorphism which is the norm in such organisms, it goes to show the plasticity of outcome due to the flexibility of human cultural forms.

Jason Goldman of Thoughtful Animal reminded me of the 2003 paper a few days ago, so I thought it would be useful to review it again for new readers (as I know most of you have not been reading for 7 years! To understand how one Y chromosomal lineage can have such a wide distribution across such a large proportion of the human race, here is a quote attributed to Genghis Khan: The greatest joy for a man is to defeat his enemies, to drive them before him, to take from them all they possess, to see those they love in tears, to ride their horses, and to hold their wives and daughters in his arms.

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